In Like Him: Errol Flynn, the Tasmanian Devil

Following hard on the heels of yesterday’s post on suave star Rudolph Valentino, today we’ll revisit another debonair leading man from early Hollywood….

Did you know that when Errol Flynn penned his autobiography, he wanted to entitle it “In Like Me“? Personally, I think this is one of the most brilliant & hilarious titles ever, but the publishing company (insisting upon a little more decorum) re-titled it “My Wicked, Wicked Ways“.

Errol Flynn genuinely was from Tasmania (I know, it’s all just too much, isn’t it?), and he certainly made a name for himself out of being devil-may-care… hence the famous “in like Flynn” expression. 😉

If Flynn was one of your very first classic-movie crushes, you are in excellent company (including mine!). And he certainly reeled in the lasses during his heyday, with his air of derring-do and his notorious way with the ladies.

So, for all you modern gents out there: are you ready to prove your Flynn-worthiness? Step one, make your way to the wardrobe department and get suited up in something appropriately historical:

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And next, here’s a quick quiz, followed by some pointers:

First off, can you look equally manly wearing…

1) Elizabethan pumpkin pants

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2) multi-coloured satin & velvet

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3) a feathery hat & spangled breeches

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4) or bright green leggings?

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If so, then you are already well on your way!

In order to achieve full Flynnishness, though, you must accessorize with the following:

1) one or more items of weaponry, skilfully handled

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2) an expression either noble, cheeky, or come-hither

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4) a cocky stance (ahem)

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5) a clinging woman (preferably Olivia de Havilland)

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Finally, top it off with one of the most gleaming grins in Hollywood:

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And there you have it!

According to the publicity –>

 you are now officially a

HANDSOME!

DASHING!

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In like Flynn.

😉

P.S. I have waxed on, in previous posts, about my fondness for hussar-type jackets. Add a dash(ing) of Flynn to this, and voilà! Something that could arguably be as verboten as the title “In Like Me”….

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A list of films featured in this post:

Captain Blood (1935), The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936), The Prince and the Pauper (1937), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (1939), Dodge City (1939), The Sea Hawk (1940), Santa Fe Trail (1940), They Died with Their Boots On (1941), The Adventures of Don Juan (1948)

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2 thoughts on “In Like Him: Errol Flynn, the Tasmanian Devil

  1. This is a great blog post! Errol was the best, the best-looking, the best-built, and among the most athletic of all the great swashbucklers! Unfortunately, in spite of his great victories in the imaginative world of film, he was tragically unable to hold a steady and secure course in his life, becoming yet another victim of “success,” fame, and wealth, succumbing to alcohol and drugs, and dying far too young (in my own home city of Vancouver, no less). Ah, but he did leave us with such great moments in film, didn’t he!
    Rest in peace, Captain Peter Blood — there’ll never be another like you!

    • Agreed – he was one of a kind!
      And yes, despite his misdeeds and his downward spiral in the later years of his life, he has left us with a legacy of celluloid brilliance.
      Here’s what one of his co-stars, Greer Garson, had to say on that subject:
      “His life was one of highs and lows, and he burned himself out much too soon. In thinking of him, let us remember, above all, that to millions of people the world over he brought exhilarating and joyous entertainment, and lifted their imagination and their spirits out of the doldrums and tensions of day-to-day living with a glorious vision of adventure, chivalry, and romance.”

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