Thor: The Vivid World

I recently watched Thor: The Dark World, and was struck by the beauty of the artwork in the end credits. Each character is highlighted by a swathe (or swatch, if you prefer) of vibrant colour: red for Thor, green for Loki, and occasionally gold for Odin, Jane, Heimdall, or Darcy. It was a very artistic reference to the crayon-hued comic book outfits the main characters wear in the film:

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ImageImage~ artwork by Claus Studios ~

Somehow the stark aesthetic reminded me of another beautifully artistic set of credits: the opening ones from Spartacus (1960). In this case, instead of colours, a shape, image, or accoutrement is used to evoke each character:

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 ~ designed by Saul Bass ~

watch the Spartacus credits here:

(with, incidentally, an amazing soundtrack by Alex North)

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2 thoughts on “Thor: The Vivid World

  1. I haven’t seen Thor. I doubt that it would be my favourite style of movie. (I’m imagining lots of gratuitous violent scenes — not much left to the imagination?) But I do appreciate the way you’ve brought attention to the artistic flair in the end credits. And since my mother is half Swedish, I’m interested in Norse culture and may yet see the film.
    I did see Spartacus a while ago, and I enjoyed it, especially after reading Howard Fast’s novel. I hadn’t noticed the way the credits were handled so artistically until I saw your blog page. You have a great site here, and this is an excellent post!

    • Thanks for your comments, Leonardo!

      I must admit that Thor and its sequel do indeed boast perhaps more than their fair share of gratuitous violence – something I’m not fond of either! Thankfully, there are enough other elements (references to Norse mythology, intriguing sets and costumes, and a surprising amount of humour) to offset this, at least for me. I have some Scandinavian background myself, as you do, so I have a soft spot for all things Nordic!

      With regards to Spartacus, I’ve also read Fast’s novel, and I enjoyed the film adaptation too – if “enjoy” is the right word for a movie that packs such an emotional wallop, and had me in tears by the end… (I guess Spartacus’ history is sufficiently well known that I don’t need to add a “spoiler” warning for anyone else reading this!). I also appreciate the story’s socio-political message, as well as the fact that Spartacus is a genuine, real-life hero!

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